Game Preview: Atlanta Braves (11-15) at Florida Marlins (15-12)

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GAME PREVIEW

Atlanta Braves (11-15) at Florida Marlins (15-12)

Pitching matchup: Derek Lowe (3-1, 3.03 ERA) vs. Graham Taylor (0-1, 6.23 ERA)

Time: 7:10 p.m. EDT

Location: Dolphin Stadium, Atlanta

TV: SportSouth Radio: 640 WGST

Weather: Partly Cloudy, 81 degrees

Twitter: Tomahawk Take

Between the poor hitting, the dreadful home stand and Carlos Delgado’s muffed catch in last night’s 4-3 series finale loss to the New York Mets, we all could use a win.

The Braves (11-15) begin yet another short two-game series tonight against the Florida Marlins (15-12). Atlanta ended their eight-game stretch at Turner Field with a dismal record of 2-6. By no means are they out of things in the National League East, but they are quickly sinking and now sit four games out of first place.

If any good news can be had as Atlanta starts this eight-game road trip is that these Fish from Florida have floundered since they last swept the Braves more than two weeks ago. Though they sit in second, the Marlins are just 4-6 in their last ten games after starting the season 11-1.

Derek Lowe (3-1, 3.03 ERA) will try to right the ship for Atlanta on the mound. The right-hander faced the Marlins in his second start of the 2009 season and allowed four earned runs and five walks in five innings — a game the Braves lost 10-4.

Lowe has won his last two outings, pitching past the sixth inning in both starts while allowing a total of two runs collectively. The sinker-baller is 0-1 with a 6.06 ERA against the Marlins in his last three go-a rounds.

Atlanta will face 24-year old Graham Taylor (0-1, 6.23 ERA). The rookie is making just his third start in the bigs after picking up the no-decision in his last start against the Chicago Cubs. He surrendered two runs in five innings, but lost the chance at a decision when the Florida bullpen blew the lead.

Taylor’s biggest problem so far has been his control. In his first two starts combined he has walked nine batters. The southpaw is more of a thinking-man’s pitcher, relying more on his smarts than his average fastball.